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Angelina Jolie's New Film Becomes Part of Oscars History

Angelina Jolie's latest movie First They Killed My Father has officially landed a place on the long list of projects under consideration for next year's Best Foreign Language Film Oscar.
Oct 6, 2017 by: WENN


Angelina Jolie's New Film Becomes Part of Oscars History

Angelina Jolie's latest movie First They Killed My Father has officially landed a place on the long list of projects under consideration for next year's Best Foreign Language Film Oscar.

A record 92 countries have entered the Academy Award race, including Afghanistan, Senegal, Vietnam, and Costa Rica, and Jolie's Khmer Rouge-era drama, based on author and activist Loung Ung's memoirs, has been picked as Cambodia's entry.

Officials at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced their long list of entries on Thursday.

A nine-film shortlist will be announced ahead of Oscar nominations in January.

It's the fifth time in the last six years that a record number of entries has been received by members of the Academy. The previous record, 85, was set last year.

Meanwhile, six countries--Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal, and Syria--are entering the Oscar race for the first time.

Jolie's film is among the top contenders for the 2018 Academy Award, alongside Sweden's The Square, which picked up the coveted Palme d'Or best movie prize at the Cannes Film Festival in France earlier this year, Israel’s Foxtrot, Russia’s Loveless, France’s BPM (Beats Per Minute), and In the Fade, which is Germany's entry for the top honor.

Jolie's story of survival has won the actress/director positive reviews. The biopic, which was made in Cambodia with an all-Cambodian cast, speaking virtually no English, was released on streaming service Netflix last month, but it also secured a limited run in U.S. theaters on the same day in order to score eligibility for the Oscars.

Jolie's movie is the most high-profile submission in the race for the Best Foreign Language Film category, the rules for which stipulate a film's "creative control" must be "largely in the hands of citizens or residents of that country".