Detroit

audience Reviews

79% Audience Score79%
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    The kids that experienced that tragedy (both living and dead) are brave. Brave to come forward to invoke change.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    I just watched "Detroit", the movie that talks about the brutal police shooting of blacks inside the Algiers Motel in 1967. When I think of the news over the last two years and of how many cops had mercilessly gunned down blacks during that time and got declared innocent each and every time, I have to realize that nothing has changed in the last 50 years and black lives still don't matter anything in the United States. Police can seemingly still do whatever they want without ever having to face any consequences. And they call it a democracy. That's a real bad joke!! And this surely won't change in the near future. Really sad.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    This is as good as cinema gets. Phenomenal film making by director Kathryn Bigelow yet again. She proves she is one of the premier directors in the business today. Another heart pounding, raw and riveting recounting of the events from 1967 Detroit. The actors all deliver fine convincing peformances as well.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    On Sunday, July 23, 1967, the Detroit Police Department staged a raid on an unlicensed club during a celebration for returning black veterans from the Vietnam War. While suspects are being arrested, a mob forms and starts throwing rocks at the officers before looting nearby stores and starting fires, beginning the 12th Street Riot. With state authorities, elected representatives, and even emergency services unable to maintain any semblance of order, Governor George W. Romney authorizes the Michigan Army National Guard and President Lyndon B. Johnson authorizes Army paratroopers to enter Detroit in order to provide assistance. On the second day of rioting, two cops pursue a fleeing looter. One of them, Philip Krauss (Will Poulter), kills the man with a shotgun against orders, but is allowed to remain on duty until his superiors can decide whether to file murder charges... The film received positive reviews from critics, with particular praise towards Bigelow's direction, Boal's screenplay and the performances of John Boyega, Will Poulter and Algee Smith, but was a box office failure, only grossing $24 million against its $34 million budget. Rotten Tomatoes consensus reads, "Detroit delivers a gut-wrenching – and essential – dramatisation of a tragic chapter from America's past that draws distressing parallels to the present. Richard Roeper of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film 4 out of 4 stars and called it one of 2017's best, saying: "Journalist-screenwriter Mark Boal (Bigelow's collaborator on The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty) does a magnificent job of juggling the multiple storylines and creating fully authentic characters—some flawed, some basically decent, some evil." Writing for Rolling Stone, Peter Travers praised the cast and script, giving the film 3.5/4 stars and saying, "... Detroit is far more than a liberal howl against the escalating toxicity of racism in America. Bigelow, with the same immersive intensity that Christopher Nolan brings to Dunkirk, smacks us down in the middle of a brutal historical event so we can see it – and feel it – for ourselves." Kathryn Bigelow has been a favourite director of mine since "Near Dark" and she keeps on delivering. This story based on actual events in 1967 is hard to watch at times and you end up in an emotional rollercoaster ride. The subject matter of racism is something we continuously see today and it is a current topic as ever. "Detroit" is a time document and an important one. Kathryn Bigelow is by far one of Hollywood greatest directors to my mind and with "Detroit" she shows yet again her eye for dramatic scenestructures and outstanding emotional engagement. "Detroit" is well made, well directed, well acted and well shot with a great documentary vibe to it. "Detroit" provokes and upsets, which is exactly what it should be doing.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    Detroit is essential viewing for the issues it highlights. The experience is gripping and emotional while the performances of the cast are fantastic.
  • 0.5 of 5 stars
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    A gripping and intense movie with incredibly powerful acting piqued my interest so much that I went to research the subject matter - and quickly found out that real life events were misrepresented and sensationalised to fit mainstream media's far left narrative. I denounce racism, but I reject media conditioning just as much. Very disappointed.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    I don't know much about the real events, but I found this dramatization very well made. Bigelow manages the material in hand very well and gets some good performances from her cast.
  • 2 of 5 stars
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    Look forward to this the reviews looked good.Far to long and the director did not do justice, i did not feel i was realy there,by that i mean it was not realistic, i did not feel the pain of the conflict of the time,the start is confusing and some what boaring and not interesting, the film could of been shorter and more to the point,sorry but not a classic
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    Some really tense moments, but goes on too long
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Detroit mas alla de ser un retrato preocupante, es un alza al racizmo actual envuelta en sangre y lagrimas de quienes lo sufren, la dramatica situacion que relata Kathryn Bigelow resulta ser mas que fascinante e impactante.