Mother

audience Reviews

89% Audience Score89%
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    This slow and disturbing movie distorts with an unreliable perspective - that of an obsessively devoted, smothering mother. Right off the bat she is clearly a bit batty, but her slanted view of good (her son) and evil (every perceived and real threat to her son) soon had me caught in her relentless pursuit of the truth. The twist at the end should have been obvious, but I was as surprised as she was, so deeply drawn into her righteous belief as I was. In the end, she disappoints in almost every way a character can, betraying her own sense of justice, falling into tears for wrongs that only she can right. Another amazing film from a director that doesn't often leave you with a smile, but does leave you thinking and questioning your assumptions.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    This is a movie about faith, and how faith, in the wrong circumstances, can turn into apologism, and how apologism, when pushed into a corner, can turn into something much worse.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Jeez, this movie just reveals how naively we look at reality
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Allied to great interpretations, Bong Joon-ho leaves his mark on a sinuous, raw and sometimes perverse plot.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    A mystery of intricate emotions and mesmerizing performances, Bong Joon Ho's second best after "Parasite." He's able to craft Hitchcockian with bleak New Wave-esque qualities but purely all his own.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    The level of blindness that love is capable of precipitating is scary, but the actions humans are capable of when that blindness is removed can be downright horrifying. Bong Joon-ho makes what could be a straight forward mystery so much more absorbing and interesting by employing a Dostoyevskian like exploration into the mechanisms within us that are ultimately responsible for the decisions we make.
  • 1 of 5 stars
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    A critically acclaimed movie which some even consider his masterpiece. But it was unexpectedly boring to me - watching an old lady saving her autistic son was not my cup of tea - and the ending was so unbelievably predictable that the whole movie seemed pointless.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    Bong Joon-ho has such a unique style to his movies. Parasite, Snowpiercer, and Mother, all have undeniable similarities yet each movie is so unique. They all offer a different perspective on a similar narrative. Mother is a narrative on unconditional love, classism, and anger. How far will you go for your child? Who will help you? All these questions are raised by the amazing directing, cinematography, and symbolism.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    Mother is a fantastic film about how powerful a mother's love can be, even to the point of corrupting an otherwise good woman. From the first moments of the film, the viewer sympathizes with Mother as her difficulties with her mentally-challenged son are made exceedingly evident. Jin-Tae's corrupting and negative influence has clearly altered Do-Joon's way of thinking and his mannerisms, leading to a dangerously unstable blend of ignorance and lewd thoughts/behaviors. As we view much of the film through Do-Joon's perspective, the viewer is often 'misled' from the truth due to Do-Joon's mental capacity and his view of the world around him. Bong Joon Ho expertly subverts the audiences expectations with the final twist and the resulting brutality, leaving the viewer to question their own morality (a common theme in Bong's films). What was especially striking however, was the inclusion of Do-Joon's rationale behind placing the corpse on the rooftop, which was distressingly sympathetic. The viewer, and Mother, is left wondering what Do-Joon truly knows about his actions and the actions of those around him, leaving the entire film in doubt. Bong's directing was once again superb, getting the most out of each and every actor on screen, especially with more minor characters who, despite limited screen time, felt relatively fleshed out and 'real.' This is one of Bong's strongest cinematic efforts and a must-watch for anyone who enjoyed the mainstream (and simply masterful) Parasite.
  • 0.5 of 5 stars
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    Blecky's Netsux review: I rented this movie years ago from Netsux, but my review was removed. Someone must have been offended, but I didn't say anything offensive; I just stated the truth of my viewing experience. So, I'll say it again in simple and, what should be, inoffensive terms. The main characters were cartoonish, and the supporting characters were archetypes. Perhaps this is typical of older Korean films, but as an American viewer, I found it off putting and irritating. I've just watched Parasite and did not have the same experience. I found Mother annoying and unpleasant, and found myself unable to comprehend how the police couldn't put 2 and 2 together as soon as they found the victim and everything they needed to know right there with her.