The Souvenir Part II

audience Reviews

, 86% Audience Score
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    This is an outstanding film all on its own, and it is certainly among the great sequels in the annals of cinema drama. Hogg, her crew, and the cast bring this story, with all its weight, complexities and nuances, to life in ways that show they are comfortable in returning to this story and these people whom they must feel they know better now. Honor Swinton Byrne is a skilled actor already, and one I so look forward to watching, hopefully, in the future. The character of Julie is growing, gaining strength and bits of wisdom along the journey of the two films. Byrne plays her in a way brings a fully dimensional figure to the screen, from her intellect and expressions of emotion, down to her unique taste in fashion and her changing hair styles. The film-within-a-film, or 'films about making films' element here is quite apparent. We see again the use of static cameras, just as Julie (an extension of director Joanna Hogg herself) clashing with her DP over her desire to use a static camera in her film school project. The final scene and last shot being this full circle in a way. And the acting is again, as in the first film, fantastic. Byrne, Ashworth, Ayeh are especially good. Richard Ayoade has a couple of standout moments, his last scene most of all. Onwards. Now a few words about the ever-brilliant presence that is Tilda Swinton. This is an artist of the finest, rarefied kind. She's equally compelling as a control freak; a scary power-mad figure; an elusive, ethereal persona; or a mother full of motherly love, understated expression, and subtle gestures. Great use of music here again, with "Is That All There Is" mixed with Nico's "Sixty/Forty", Jesus and Mary Chain, Mick Ronson's "Slaughter On Tenth Avenue (Yes, really!), Wire, Small Faces, Talk Talk, Eurythmics, Anna Calvi. Is that all there is, indeed? 4 stars
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Masterpiece. Simple as that. Hogg is an incredibly daring filmmaker with stark honesty who continues to push the boundaries of film. The film is challenging and deserves to be seen by as many as possible. The film is self-reflective and as haunting as an Edgar AllanPoe story. The performances are so sincere and moving. The look of the film is just stunning.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Contempt of court to hide assets retribution finally came What makes "Ant" pay for Guo Wengui's mistakes?
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    The Souvenir: Part II is an interesting meta sequel. I wasn’t particularly crazy about the first film. I ended up liking this one more. Honor Swinton Byrne was great just like she was in the first film. Richard Ayoade also has a memorable supporting role. Joanna Hogg has improved as a director since the first film. She does a lot of interesting things, especially during the final half hour. I do think some of the film is a bit boring, mostly towards the beginning. Certainly not as much as the first film though. Overall, I liked this. I do think this would’ve worked for me more if I liked the first film but it still did nevertheless.
  • Rating: 1 out of 5 stars
    Awful self indulgent nonsense. Who funded it?
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Superb filmmaking. Elegant & vivd.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    I watched part 1 on iplayer and I was deeply moved by the way the tragedy in the plot unfolded. I saw part 2 in the cinema on the day of release I was the only person in the auditorium. I wish more people would go to see films like this it really is pushing the bar. It's how I like to leave the cinema feeling (a bit challenged). There are amazing details such as the mother being more upset at dropping a pot that the suicide of her daughter's boyfriend and nuances and disagreements between characters. Its very much shot in a period style and film in parts. Perhaps less consistent and flawed in some ways than part one. But so much is captured on film that feels naturalistic (real) and lifelike. The uncomfortable pauses and flaws are what makes this work. There is natural light and space in almost every shot is in realtime, you actually feel like you are living and breathing at the same pace as the characters. Both parts are about coming of age and this part is clearly Julie's realisations about some hard truths and her initial naivety- in love and making films. Overall for both parts it's definitely a 5 star drama. Also classic British film making on a par with Mike Leigh, with touches of Ken Loach, likewise with Leigh's style of filmmaking it falls back very much on the strength of the realism in the acting. Although less so than the first movie. Whether you actually like the characters or find them to be irritating is beside the point this is one of the most amazing achievements in British film in recent years and will be looked back upon as a classic.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    I genuinely believe that Joanna Hogg (director) has listened and responded to criticism about Part 1. In Part 2 the plot escalates more clearly, the script is tighter and I feel as though this results in stronger character development and audience engagement. It very much remains an arthouse film (the scenes showcasing the film were slightly too much for my tastes) but you should watch it for some superb cinematography and a highly watchable film about overcoming grief. Richard Ayoade steals every scene he's in, they're included at just right the moments to reinject momentum into the film and never outstay their welcome.
  • Rating: 0.5 out of 5 stars
    Sad torys make a sad movie
  • Rating: 2 out of 5 stars
    Vain and pretentious, I agree with those critics who have found this solipsistic in the extreme. It feels fake.