Victim/Suspect

audience Reviews

, 75% Audience Score
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    This film was so well done and it made me so. angry. The audacity of these police officers to charge survivors with false reporting is infuriating. I am so glad this film was made and these stories are being told but it also made me want to throw things.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Just a continued look into victim blaming, and why victims are terrified to come forward. That for some reason when it comes to SA, victims are lying regardless of evidence, and the perpetrators are innocent even if they're guilty. It also showcases the intimidation, abuse, and continued violations SA victims are subject to when they seek justice. It is infuriating, and this documentary very clearly demonstrates that. I was a SANE nurse for 6 years, and also a survivor myself. These instances shown in this documentary is the reason why I became a SANE nurse, so the survivor would always have an advocate.
  • Rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars
    eduaim.moodle.mii.lv
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    This is important journalism! Too many as are victims of the system. Thank you for this!
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    This is an eyeopener. This storyline is written well and shows Police do NOT care for women's rightr. Whatever Roger Ebert review. He's an idiot who is a freaking dinosaur that needs to reform his opinions to current understanding. These days are not the Good Ole Boys Club anymore.
  • Rating: 0.5 out of 5 stars
    As a woman who has been victim to a sexual crime I was not impressed with this 'documentary'. It was very clear that the filmmaker had an agenda to cause an uproar about a topic, so she tried to scrounge up anything she could to fit her thesis. The film focuses on 3 cases to try to prove her point... The first case leaves out so much information it is hard to fairly judge what happened. All we really know is that the woman tells her mom the next morning "something happened that I didn't want it to happen". The police essentially tells her we have video footage that shows you were having a good time with him (it comes to light that they were mistaken about who was in the video footage), so she admits she lied and pleads guilty to filing a false report. The film leads us to believe she was cold and uncomfortable, and that's why she agrees with the officer that she lied? The second case supports the documentary narrative very well and does seem to prove poor police work. Although the shortest segment, if this was the only case presented in the film, I would have found this film more interesting and more honest. But then comes in the third case, which is utterly ridiculous. This woman's story is that she is a psychology & criminal justice major who claimed she was assaulted by a police officer who pulled her over. She doesn't ever make an attempt to describe what the officer looks like when asked, and all it took the investigator to get the her to confess that she was lying was to calmly say "we found some video, and we see your car go by but no one else. The last thing I want to do is call you a liar, but no stop happened did it?" And she say "NO". He asks "why did you make this up?" She says "I don't know" before agreeing to come down to the station to sign paperwork admitting she lied. So what good reason does the documentary give for her admitting that she lied so quickly if she wasn't lying? Uh.. it doesn't. The documentary ends on a pretty cringy 'victims statement' to some new police recruits, a basically 'Believe all women' mantra, including the woman from the first and third case. It was hard to watch. Good take aways for me: Should the burden of proof fall on the victim? No. Are there women who report sexual assault and who are not believed by police, the results of which are harmful? Yes. But there was NO other side of the story... are there women who lie to police and waste precious resources? Yes. What happens to the male victims of false rape claims? What happens to other victims who don't get the full focus of police on their cases because of liars (seemingly like the last case in the documentary) who are wasting everyone's time? Should they just go free with no punishment?... This film maker seems to think so.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    This is a documentary. Every parent should make sure their daughter views. While the case is highly profiled, probably reflect the worst of the worst the bias of mail police officers against female victims, can't be denied. It is infuriatingly ironic that the police can legally LIE (in true doublespeak fashion they refer to it as a "ruse") in an interrogation and present completely false information as if it was true fact. I found it very well done and highly informative.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    A journalist, Rae de Leon, began investigating women who were victims of assault, but were instead charged with filing a false report and the facts de Leon uncover are damning. There will be times your heart will break and you'll be angry, but this is an important documentary to watch if you have a daughter, a sister or any friend who is female. The police work (or lack thereof) is sickening. This doc needs to be seen! Final Score: 8.3/10
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Everyone needs to see this. I'd like to learn about more people this has happened to. I'd like to know what that pompous interrogator police guy is up to these days. He and the others like him need to be stopped!
  • Rating: 2 out of 5 stars
    A bit of a snooze fest. The fat chick is a bit dumb, dug her own hole.